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Day Trippers

The 7th of July this year marks the 60th anniversary of the Woolton Church Summer Fete in Liverpool where a young John Lennon was introduced to an even younger Paul McCartney for the first time. That meeting has gone down in musical folklore leading to one of the most extraordinary writing partnerships that changed the face of modern music.

Now, sixty years on, I’m interested in the relationship of the Beatles to this small part of south Liverpool – just a few streets. I am taken by the idea that tourists travel from all over the world to visit such ordinary suburban streets leading to the somewhat incongruous sight of international day trippers rubbing shoulders with locals in very un-touristy locations.

Often they have travelled from far and wide for a once in a lifetime visit to the UK: they take in Buckingham Palace, Stonehenge, Edinburgh Castle and a few run down streets of council housing in Liverpool!

Having grown up in Liverpool, I’m intrigued by the power the band still has to attract people from far and wide and how the locals just go about their business semi-oblivious to the daily invasion.

In Arnold Grove in particular, where George Harrison grew up, the house is still occupied by an elderly lady – every day hoards of tourists walk past children playing in the street, as George would have done, to have their picture taken outside her house and sometimes peer in through her windows. In Madryn Street, Ringo Starr’s home, all the houses are now boarded up and visitors come to write on the metal shutters and sometimes to dance!

The Magical Mystery Tour bus passes Madryn St. the childhood home of Ringo Starreaston_beatles_01

Magical Mystery Tour bus tourists (on the pavement) and National Trust visitors (in the garden) of 20, Forthlin Road, the childhood home of Paul McCartney.easton_beatles_02

Canadian Tourists at Forthlin Road.easton_beatles_03

Forthlin Roadeaston_beatles_04

Spanish tourists at ‘Mendips’, the childhood home of John Lennon.easton_beatles_05

A ‘selfie’ for the Magical Mystery Tour at the gates of Strawberry Fields.easton_beatles_06

“Behind the shelter in the middle of the roundabout”, the Magical Mystery Tour passes the  ‘barber’ and the ‘bank’ at the top of Penny Lane.easton_beatles_07

“In Penny Lane, there is a barber showing photographs”easton_beatles_08

A group of German tourists dancing outside the former home of Ringo Starr. Madryn Street in Dingle is one of ‘The Welsh Streets’, traditional Liverpool terraces, now all boarded up and awaiting a council decision on whether to demolish or refurbish.easton_beatles_09

A busload of tourists descend on the tiny cul-de-sac Arnold Grove where George Harrison lived as a young boy. The house and those surrounding it are still lived in and each day residents tolerate a stream of visitors from all around the world.easton_beatles_10

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Website updates

Finally got round to updating some work on the website:

Tourism campaigns and image library work for Mid Wales/Powys and Waterways Ireland – both can be found under the ‘Assigned’ section: www.craigeaston.com

Here’s just three pictures from each…..

Easton_Waterways_Ireland_01 Easton_Waterways_Ireland_02 Easton_Waterways_Ireland_03 Wales_01 Wales_02 Wales_03

New Tourism Campaign for Liverpool Albert Dock

It’s been a busy few weeks with the InterContinental Masterclasses, finishing off a large tourism campaign for Mid Wales (weather was so good in the summer, we had to postpone the second half of the shoot – might have been accused of misleading people!) and this big shoot for Liverpool Albert Dock.

Entitled ‘Magic in the Air’ the campaign was devised and art directed by Brigid Benson with the brief ‘to show Liverpool and the Albert Dock in a new light.’ Her concept was beautifully simple, yet inspired: light the dock from the inside.

Now, the Albert Dock is a BIG place – the largest group of Grade 1 listed buildings in the UK. It is beautifully illuminated at night from the outside, but the inner quay with all the bars, restaurants, galleries and museums is dark. Our task was to illuminate the inside to a level where it glowed like a football stadium at night creating the desire for those on the outside to find out about all the excitement on the inside.

Many recce’s, meetings, negotiations, permissions, help from volunteers and crew, setting up 55kW of flood lighting and 700m of festoon lighting later our shoot week arrived. So did the rain!

Now, the Albert Dock and Liverpool Waterfront is a very well known location and an iconic image of the city. It is usually shot from across the River Mersey in Birkenhead (admittedly a shot I have done previously too) but the brief this time was to come up with something new and exciting. Brigid and I crawled across rooftops all over the city looking at various vantage points and we decided on three separate viewpoints to shoot by day and by night.

First up we shot across Salthouse Dock towards Albert Dock with the River Mersey and the Wirral peninsula behind. The daytime shot was ‘animated’ with help from all the staff and volunteers at the Liverpool Watersports Centre who came down to sail boats around and around Salthouse Dock for us.

…and the same view by night with the electric meters going wild on the inner quay!

The second shot incorporated more of the iconic waterfront: The port of Liverpool Building, one of the ‘three graces’ that form the centrepiece of the waterfront (we were shooting from the Liver Building so that’s not in shot!!), the new Museum of Liverpool and the Echo Arena and BT Convention Centre in the background.

and last but not least… ‘The Flagship’ – Brigid’s mad idea was to bring the flagship ZEBU into the middle of the Albert Dock and light it with festoon lighting all around and up and down the masts. Big thanks to all the volunteers and crew and especially the ‘top men’ who scaled the heights to make the vision a reality. Charlie the skipper had to come down from Whitehaven to manoeuvre the ship into position and then did an amazing job trying to hold it there still enough for us to do the shot. Usually in a week of bad weather I’m happy as long as it’s windy. On this occasion of course we weren’t allowed any wind either – needed to hold the ship steady for as long as possible and hopefully get the reflections too. All worked out in the end, but there were a few nervous moments for the client (I remained calm and confident all along – honest!!)